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If you always know how to improve then you'll always be getting better and better! And this Practice Menu helps provide a clear structure for your violin practice.
The melody of this sorrowful piano prelude by Armenian composer and musicologist, Gayane Chebotaryan, yearns and wails, ebbs and flows, grows and wilts. Intense stuff!
Anton Rubinstein was a Russian pianist, composer, conductor and educator (Tchaikovsky’s teacher!). He is best known for this delicious little sweetmeat, Melody in F.
A ‘Bransle’ is a type of Renaissance dance popular in the early 16th century … lots of dancers, in a line or circle, usually holding hands, having a merry old time!
John Stanley was an 18th century English composer and organist. Here's our arrangement of one of his particularly triumphant organ voluntaries for violin and piano.
This is a gorgeous, idyllic, pastoral song by the excellently named Norwegian violinist and composer, Ole Bull. Those herd-girls must be having a really lovely Sunday!
Johann Vierdank was a composer of the early 1600s. His Capriccio II features some wonderfully antiphonal, delightfully conversational interplay between the two parts.
This set of variations for three violins by Aleksey Yanshinov is a real bag of treats … there are loads of different techniques, styles and moods to get stuck into!
The German pianist and composer, Carl Bohm, really knew how to write a good tune! This is a fine example of a Sarabande — a slow, stately dance with 3 beats in a bar.
This lovely, lilting, flowing, yearning, dancing Medieval/Renaissance Ronde - written by that mysterious composer ‘Anon.’! - is exclusively arranged for two violins.
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